Paid Family Leave Around the Country

Paid Family Leave Around the Country

California, New York, New Jersey, and Rhode Island have all enacted laws providing paid family leave to employees who need time off to care for a seriously ill family member or bond with a new child.  Paid family laws in these states is paid for through employee payroll deductions and pay from 50 to 70 percent of an employee’s weekly wage for six to eight weeks of leave. 

Colorado's New Consumer Data Privacy Law- Effective September 1, 2018

Colorado's New Consumer Data Privacy Law- Effective September 1, 2018

Come September 1, 2018, Colorado’s latest consumer data privacy legislation, House Bill 18-1128, goes into effect. The new law requires covered entities to establish reasonable security procedures, responsibly dispose of personal identifying information, ensure that third party service providers properly handle personal identifying information, and timely notify affected residents of a security breach.

Are you Required to Pay on Holidays?

Are you Required to Pay on Holidays?

With the upcoming summer holidays approaching, many employers have questions regarding holiday pay.  Are private employers required to give employees time off?  Does the law require private employers to pay a premium rate, such as time and a half, to employees who work on holidays?  State and federal laws differ with regard to holiday pay.

 

Rhode Island Sick and Safe Leave Time Law: Effective July 1, 2018

Rhode Island Sick and Safe Leave Time Law:  Effective July 1, 2018

Are you an employer in Rhode Island?  If you answered yes, you better be prepared for the Rhode Island Sick and Safe Leave Time Law, which will be in effect on July 1, 2018.  While the Rhode Island Department of Labor and Training has stated that it will not enforce fines contained within the statute until January 1, 2019- employees are still able to sue their employers over the new law.

ADA and Website Compliance

ADA and Website Compliance

Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) applies to all places of public accommodation (businesses open to the public). The federal circuits are somewhat split on whether the ADA applies to websites, and whether such websites must have a nexus to physical structures. Many recent cases, however, are trending toward requiring website accessibility (see below discussion of a recent summary judgment ruling out of California), and the Department of Justice (“DOJ”) has previously indicated that Title III of the ADA applies to websites that meet the definition of a public accommodation.

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